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  Posted on Aug.10.2009 @ 11:40PM EDT by chontri
Accept my words only when you have examined them for yourselves;
do not accept them simply because of the reverence you have for me.
Those who only have faith in me and affection... continue...

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→→→→ vertical line TOPIC: NICOTINE AND MENTAL HEALTH
vertical line Posted on Feb.16.2007 @ 12:21PM EDT by bupanishad

There are studies that demonstrate advantages of smoking in medical conditions, including psychological illness. Epidemiologists have validated what many mental health practitioners have long noticed: The smoking rate among people with schizophrenia, depression and anxiety disorders is far higher than average. It is widely believed that people with certain mental health problems are self-medicating with [tobacco] because the nicotine helps their minds function better. However, persons who wish to derive the benefits of nicotine for these conditions, or to help them deal with the stress of loved ones in distress, should be able to use non-tobacco forms of nicotine such as the patch.

However, persons who wish to derive the benefits of nicotine for these conditions, or to help them deal with the stress of loved ones in distress, should be able to use non-tobacco forms of nicotine such as the patch.

N.B.Recovering alcoholics find nicotine more rewarding than people who have no history of drinking problems.

Recovering alcoholics find nicotine more rewarding than people who have no history of drinking problems.

Andrew

"TheoSophist"


Go to Latest Reply   Reply to this Topic   Email bupanishad
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Reply from whatzen
Feb.16.2007
03:36PM EDT 
Email whatzen
vertical line You know, I think they might be right. I go absolutely crazy without a cigarette!
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68741
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Reply from free1500
Feb.16.2007
05:06PM EDT 
Email free1500
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"TheoSophist"

What is that? A Theosphist?

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Reply from ZenTurtle
Feb.16.2007
05:44PM EDT 
vertical line I use to be an occasional cigar smoker.
Then I was put on an SSRI and smoked my brains out. As long as I was on that drug I couldn't stop smoking for the life of me. A few weeks after I stopped I returned to the status of casual cigar smoker.
(I've since given up the cigars as well)
So I have no doubt about deep-rooted connection between nicotine and mental health.

Just go to a mental health hospital or a drug rehab clinic. There's a reason why it's the chosen past-time at these places.

But I have noticed that a disproportionate part of the smoking population do have mental health problems... Or vise versa?
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68748
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Reply from Woodsman
Feb.16.2007
07:13PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line I am crazy enough without it.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68751
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Reply from zen-zen
Feb.17.2007
12:29AM EDT 
vertical line The medical effects of nicotine have been discussed a lot in scientific circles. However - there has been debate about which came first - the mental illness or the use of nicotine. In a nutshell it's very hard to say which came first: Nicotine or mental problems.

However, it is clear that nicotine does ease the symptoms of some mental diseases such as dementia. It may even slow the progress of dementia.

Yet, it has been proven that long-time use of nicotine causes increase in the amount of certain receptors in the brain *permanently*. For that reason it is hard to say whether the people with mental problems actually have caused the problem themselves or not.

Think of it ... what would happen if it could be proven that most mental illnesses of our time would be caused by the use of nicotine?

And yes, I am also a nicotinist. However, I do not smoke.
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Reply from zbishak
Feb.17.2007
08:12AM EDT 
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The extremity of the anti smoking advertsing,

Sanity, or a new mental disorder?

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68764
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Reply from ______
Feb.17.2007
09:01AM EDT 
vertical line I don't smoke, I don't smoulder;
Like a log on the fire,
I, burning for you.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68765
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Reply from Woodsman
Feb.17.2007
09:49AM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line Off I go for a ski. Windy.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68766
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Reply from Woodsman
Feb.17.2007
11:47AM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line Met a lost skier on the trail, and gave him directions home.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68769
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Reply from ______
Feb.17.2007
11:47AM EDT 
vertical line :)
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Reply from Norwolf
Feb.17.2007
12:39PM EDT 
Email Norwolf
vertical line I once heard that smoking is bad for your health.  Is this true?
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68771
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Reply from bupanishad
Feb.17.2007
01:57PM EDT 
Email bupanishad
vertical line Quote: "

"TheoSophist"

What is that? A Theosphist?

"
.......

"
.......

Yes, a member of the Pasadena Theosophical Society.  But, it also indicates that I am a Sophist who delves into religious, scientific (physics) and philosophical issues.  I am an autodidact who is very eclectic, and therefore a syncretist, who dives deep into Zen as well as many other similar subjects, and I am able to converse on many levels of both Buddhism and other religious topics.  Zen is my favorite and gives me much comfort in this confusing world.  Thanks for asking!

Andrew

"TheoSophist"

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Reply from bupanishad
Feb.17.2007
02:04PM EDT 
Email bupanishad
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Quote: "I use to be an occasional cigar smoker.
Then I was put on an SSRI and smoked my brains out. As long as I was on that drug I couldn't stop smoking for the life of me. A few weeks after I stopped I returned to the status of casual cigar smoker.
(I've since given up the cigars as well)
So I have no doubt about deep-rooted connection between nicotine and mental health.

Just go to a mental health hospital or a drug rehab clinic. There's a reason why it's the chosen past-time at these places.

But I have noticed that a disproportionate part of the smoking population do have mental health problems... Or vise versa?
"
.

I love cigars!  I'm schizoaffective, bi-polar, and have PTSD from Vietnam and a military career.  Cigars are a real joy to me, regardless of their dangers.  They replace my alcoholism quite well, and give me much comfort (BUT COSTLY!)

Andrew

"TheoSophist"........

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Reply from lehish
Feb.17.2007
03:26PM EDT 
Email lehish
vertical line Have you watched? Whenever you feel nervous you immediately start smoking. It is a way to avoid nervousness; you become occupied with smoking. Really it is a regression. Smoking makes you again feel like a child -- unworried, nonresponsible -- because smoking is nothing but a symbolic breast. The hot smoke going in simply takes you back to the days when you were feeding on the mother's breast and the warm milk was going in; the nipple has now become the cigarette. The cigarette is a symbolic nipple.

Through regression you avoid the responsibilities and the pains of being adult. And that's what goes on through many many drugs. Modern man is drugged as never before, because modern man is living in great suffering. Without drugs it will be impossible to live in so much suffering. Those drugs create a barrier; they keep you drugged, they don't allow you enough sensitivity to know your pain.


Osho
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Reply from bupanishad
Feb.17.2007
04:52PM EDT 
Email bupanishad
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Osho (aka Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh) was my personal "Buddha" for many years and I'm still glad to hear from him occaisionally.  What he said was/is true.  We're all looking for the "Big Nipple" aren't we?  LOL

Andrew

"TheoSophist"

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Reply from whatzen
Feb.17.2007
04:56PM EDT 
Email whatzen
vertical line The bodymind still has cravings but i have left the leaf alone for a couple of years now.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68779
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Reply from ZenTurtle
Feb.17.2007
07:33PM EDT 
vertical line I just like how cool smoking makes me look.

; )
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Reply from Woodsman
Feb.17.2007
08:17PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line I must be ugly! To smokers.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68786
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Reply from Woodsman
Feb.17.2007
08:40PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line A delusion perhaps! I mean, my looks anyway.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68787
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Reply from Lionel
Feb.17.2007
09:18PM EDT 
Email Lionel
vertical line ...seeing (instant noting) the 'clinging glue' between subjective & objective through our senses contacts may help us to weaken, subside or even eleminate the building craving-forces moments of their moment-arising (cos this is the most weakest of its overall strength)... otherwise we would fall into our own selfhoodness prison... once it is locked as viewpoint or memory, we are easily habitually comfortably & conveniently fall into the trap again & again & again...without even knowing understanding or realisation...
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Reply from lehish
Feb.17.2007
11:05PM EDT 
Email lehish
vertical line yes
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Reply from -----0
Feb.18.2007
02:27AM EDT 
vertical line those moments of creation
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 68796
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Reply from free1500
Feb.18.2007
03:44AM EDT 
Email free1500
vertical line Quote: "

Quote: "I use to be an occasional cigar smoker.
Then I was put on an SSRI and smoked my brains out. As long as I was on that drug I couldn't stop smoking for the life of me. A few weeks after I stopped I returned to the status of casual cigar smoker.
(I've since given up the cigars as well)
So I have no doubt about deep-rooted connection between nicotine and mental health.

Just go to a mental health hospital or a drug rehab clinic. There's a reason why it's the chosen past-time at these places.

But I have noticed that a disproportionate part of the smoking population do have mental health problems... Or vise versa?
"
.

I love cigars!  I'm schizoaffective, bi-polar, and have PTSD from Vietnam and a military career.  Cigars are a real joy to me, regardless of their dangers.  They replace my alcoholism quite well, and give me much comfort (BUT COSTLY!)

Andrew

"TheoSophist"........

"
.........

"
.........

Man oh man can you explain all that in a grade 2 level. Please?

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Reply from ______
Feb.18.2007
09:18AM EDT 
vertical line You're living in a pipe dream mate. Is that harsh, smoke?
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Reply from Lionel
Feb.18.2007
05:41PM EDT 
Email Lionel
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...those moments of creation...

...if one, at that instant moment of noting, is sharp enough, those moments of creation or arising instantly ceased... wow, would you believe what had been said?

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Reply from tanda123
Feb.14.2009
02:56AM EDT 
Email tanda123
vertical line hi dear i am crezzy without cigrate i can't like without it
Find the latest news about Depression, Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.  Discuss Mood Disorders topics with members of the Health Community.

sheena

<a href="http://www.manicdepression.us.com">Manic Depression News and Discussion Forum</a>-Manic Depression News and Discussion Forum



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Reply from tanda123
Feb.14.2009
02:57AM EDT 
Email tanda123
vertical line  hi dear i am crezzy without cigrate i can't like without it
Find the latest news about Depression, Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.  Discuss Mood Disorders topics with members of the Health Community.

Manic Depression News and Discussion Forum
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 92351
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Reply from circles
Feb.14.2009
03:51AM EDT 
Email circles
vertical line Quit smoking 7 days ago, anxiety levels through the roof, insomnia occurred day 5. Mind is suffering, body celebrating. Interesting to watch, mind is weak, needs retraining.
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Reply from ______
Feb.14.2009
07:50AM EDT 
vertical line Ok, so then you searched for and found this thread to offset the emission. 
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Reply from immortal 1
Feb.14.2009
07:57AM EDT 
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I quit 12 years ago.

It helped to understand that Nicotine is not a drug.  It is the second most powerful poison on Earth.  (The other is in such small quantities in dirt that eating mudpies is okay for children.)

Both Nicotine and Smoke affect the body by causing a stress reaction.  Both are instinctive reactions of self-preservation to perceived threats of death and fire.  This causes the body to create and release drugs into the system to help you stay calm so you can help yourself to survive.  Smoking cigarettes is a way of tricking your body into releasing those relaxing and calming drugs without facing any real danger.

I still burn incense when I meditate.  I find that relaxing enough without the poison.

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Reply from Woodsman
Feb.16.2009
03:10PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line O2 and fire don't mix.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 92548
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