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  The Buddha was talking with Uttara, a young pupil of the bhramin Parasariya:
-Uttara, does Parasariya teach you how to develop your faculties?
-Yes, Master Gotama, he does teach us how to develop our faculties
-How does he do... continue...

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→→→→ vertical line TOPIC: THE IMMUTABILITY OF CAUSE AND EFFECTTHE IMMUTABILITY OF CAUSE AND EFFE
vertical line Posted on Apr.30.2007 @ 08:56AM EDT by stephen
 

The Immutability Of Cause And Effect

By Venerable Wu Ling

Respected Dharma Masters, respected practitioners and guests. Over the past few hundred years, the face of Buddhism has undergone several changes. First, it began to be regarded by some as a religion. Then, it was looked upon as a philosophy. Some even twisted it almost beyond recognition until it became more of a cult. And recently it has come to be portrayed by some as a show.

Some of these misunderstandings have been honest ones, often occurring as people have tried to understand and respect the teachings. Some of these misunderstandings occurred as people strove to benefit themselves at the expense of others. If we want to really understand and benefit from Buddhism, we need to go back to its original form.

Approximately two thousand years ago, in 67 AD, Buddhism officially came to China and since then, has spread and flourished throughout the country. The Emperor had sent special envoys to India to invite Buddhist monks to come to China to teach Buddhism, which at that time was understood to be an education.

The sutras, recorded teachings of Buddha Shakyamuni, address him as our "Original Teacher". Those who listened to him were called students, which is what we call ourselves today. This teacher-student relationship is only found in education. Another reason that Buddhism is an education is also to be found in the sutras, where we learn that the students would ask questions of the Buddha, who would then answer them. If the students did not thoroughly understand, or thought that we would not thoroughly understand, they would ask for further clarification, which the Buddha would provide. This is essentially a classroom discussion. Please understand that Buddha Shakyamuni simply taught. He conducted neither ceremonies nor rites.

Buddhism is Buddha Shakyamuni’s educational system, which is similar to that of Confucius for both presented similar viewpoints and methods. The goal of Buddhist education is to attain wisdom. In Sanskrit, the language of ancient India, this wisdom was called "Anuttara-Samyak-Sambhodi" meaning the perfect complete wisdom. The Buddha taught us that the main objective of our learning and cultivation is to achieve this ultimate wisdom.

He further taught us that everyone has the potential to realize this state of ultimate wisdom, because it is an intrinsic part of our nature. It is not something we can obtain externally. However, most of us have become confused through general misconceptions and therefore, are unable to realize this potential. However, if we can break through this confusion, we will realize this intrinsic part of our nature. Thus, Buddhism is an educational system aimed at regaining our own original, intrinsic self-nature.

It also teaches absolute equality, which stemmed from the Buddha's recognition that all sentient beings possess this innate wisdom and nature. Therefore, there really is no inherent difference among beings. Everyone is different now because we have lost our true nature and have become confused. The degree of wisdom exhibited by individuals depends on the degree of delusion and has nothing to do with the original true nature of the individual. The Buddha’s teachings help us to realize this innate, perfect, ultimate wisdom. With this wisdom, we can solve all of our problems and turn our suffering into happiness.

Due to our lack of wisdom, we perceive and behave foolishly, and thus suffer the consequences evoked by our incorrect thoughts, speech and behavior. If we have wisdom, our thoughts, speech and behavior will be correct; how then can we suffer when there are no ill consequences to suffer from? Of course, we will be happy. From here, we can see that suffering is caused by our delusion and the source of happiness is our own realization of wisdom.


Go to Latest Reply   Reply to this Topic   Email stephen
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Reply from Lynnoh
Apr.30.2007
11:51AM EDT 
Email Lynnoh
vertical line I'm really trying to smile
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70805
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Reply from lehish
Apr.30.2007
12:57PM EDT 
Email lehish
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dancing singing lynnoh

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70810
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Reply from boymonk
May.01.2007
01:56AM EDT 
vertical line Cause and effect is a myth, but it's a good myth! lolololol
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70818
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Reply from JoParsons
May.01.2007
04:35AM EDT 
Email JoParsons
vertical line Perfection!  Cause and Effect are as close as we mortals are going to get to perfection.  The acceptance of the immutability of it causes the opposite of suffering.  The wisdom to believe that it is immutable brings an inner peace and a contentment and a fulfillment that cannot be explained in words but is instantly understood by those who "get it".  In those moments when I am one of those people, I relish every piece of my life, every person, place and situation in it.  It came from, my faith expresses to me, Perfection.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70819
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Reply from En Shin
May.01.2007
02:12PM EDT 
Email En Shin
vertical line Immutability is an odd choice of words.  To be immutable is to be unchanging.  Nothing is unchanging, everything changes, especially cause and effect, as one becomes the other.  Perhaps what is meant is that the fact of cause and effect, that it exists and is all-pervasive, is immutable, but doesn't this become a paradox?  "The fact that everything changes is unchanging."  Kind of like "Everything I say is a lie."

Still, beyond the title, the quoted article is quite nice in its simplicity.  Indeed, Buddhism should not be seen as a religion, a philosophy or a cult.  It is a practice leading to the discovery of the innate wisdom within us all, which leads to the end of suffering.  The "perfection" JoParsons so eloquently spoke of!

;-)


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Reply from boymonk
May.01.2007
08:49PM EDT 
vertical line Perfection is a myth also, and perfect myth! Hehe
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70828
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Reply from Govindi
May.02.2007
08:24AM EDT 
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After all... The Buddha Shakyamuni was a man... an awakened man... who through compassion tought the dharma to us all. It was man who tried to call it something, give it  name. Once named, than it becomes something. Like a name seperates you as an individual, creates the "I" It was man who wanted to make ritual and rites a part of his teachings. Man Also tries to make the Buddha a God...

Prajna, wisdom of a doube edged sword, helps us to regain the true intrinsic and unconditioned self we were born with(perfection). After all... the Buddha is right there, in us, from the moment we are born in samsara. We only complicate things with ego and conditioned reactions.

Metta to All... :-)

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70829
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Reply from Lynnoh
May.02.2007
11:39AM EDT 
Email Lynnoh
vertical line Quote: "

dancing singing lynnoh

"
.........

"
.........

AH!  :)

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70832
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Reply from Lynnoh
May.02.2007
11:41AM EDT 
Email Lynnoh
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Quote: "Cause and effect is a myth, but it's a good myth! lolololol"
.........

like lolololol

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70833
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Reply from Lynnoh
May.02.2007
11:42AM EDT 
Email Lynnoh
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Quote: "Perfection is a myth also, and perfect myth! Hehe"
.........

hahaha

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70834
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Reply from Lynnoh
May.02.2007
11:45AM EDT 
Email Lynnoh
vertical line Quote: "

After all... The Buddha Shakyamuni was a man... an awakened man... who through compassion tought the dharma to us all. It was man who tried to call it something, give it  name. Once named, than it becomes something. Like a name seperates you as an individual, creates the "I" It was man who wanted to make ritual and rites a part of his teachings. Man Also tries to make the Buddha a God...

Prajna, wisdom of a doube edged sword, helps us to regain the true intrinsic and unconditioned self we were born with(perfection). After all... the Buddha is right there, in us, from the moment we are born in samsara. We only complicate things with ego and conditioned reactions.

Metta to All... :-)

interesting as in noticing the responses were made individually... and then this reading of... have I just complicated?

"
.........
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70835
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Reply from lehish
May.02.2007
02:48PM EDT 
Email lehish
vertical line Quote: "Quote: "

dancing singing lynnoh

"
.........

"
.........

AH!  :)

"
.........

"
.........

:)

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 70845
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