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  Posted on Aug.20.2009 @ 11:07PM EDT by chontri

Bhikkhus, what is ignorance?
Not knowing suffering,
Not knowing the origin of suffering,
Not knowing the cessation of suffering,
Not knowing the path leading to... continue...

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→→→→ vertical line TOPIC: HUNGRY FOR MORE...
vertical line Posted on Mar.10.2008 @ 06:10PM EDT by Steph&Nate
Hi There,

My name is Stephanie and my husband's name is Nathan. We are newlyweds of 5months now and have been doing research together on the different religions of the world. Of everything we've read we really feel a strong connection with Zen Buddhism. I am now to the point where I'm hungry and eager to learn more about it though. (Actually, to learn everything about it, but I know I should take it step by step.)

My husband and I both have very similar backgrounds as far as our families beliefs and religious views go. However, him and I both found ourselves in search of more once we no longer were living under their authority/rules.

((Nathan's father is a Southern Baptist Preacher and HIS mom is a retired Children's Ministry Leader. MY father is a (Non-Denominational) Christian Youth & Children's Director and MY mom is the Head of the churches Decorating & Arts team.))

So pretty much, we were both raised into the Christian beliefs from a very young age. (Meaning all of their views and thoughts are embedded into us deeply.) Neither of us were ever exposed to any different religious beliefs out there until we moved out and became independent. The more I dig into other beliefs it's surprising how difficult of a task it can be to "re-train your own thoughts"! (If that makes sense?)

Anyway, I dont really have direct questions to ask right now in paticular. I guess more than anything I'm curious to hear some testimonials or hear from people who can relate to us and maybe help guide us to the next best step.

If I have to form it as a Question.... Then with our given background and current situation, where would YOU suggest the next good next step is for us to take??


Thank You in advance for your help!!


Go to Latest Reply   Reply to this Topic   Email Steph&Nate
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Reply from Woodsman
Mar.10.2008
06:21PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line Hi,

I was brought up Catholic, rebelled against the "boring" Sunday services. When I reached closer to adulthood I became a Southern Baptist, baptized, born-again, the whole thing. After that I followed some even more conservative Christians. But then, I began to wonder about these "Christians" I was hanging out with, and began to spend time finding my own way. But now I have to get ready for work.  So, this is more real. Peace, John
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Reply from ______
Mar.10.2008
07:26PM EDT 
vertical line So-called Christianity of whatever hue is really Churchianity. It isn't there to liberate, it isn't about Christ Consciousness; it's there to control and keep you in your place. Churchianity is about hierarchies and position, prestige and power; it's frightened of Christs. Be your own teacher and disciple. Jesus wasn't a Christian and neither was Buddha a Buddhist. Read some books if you like. Watch the food you eat, watch your step and mind your head. There is nothing to be done because you are the capacity to see. There is nothing wrong with you, nothing about you that needs to be changed with conscious volition. Any 'change' will occur naturally. See, it's happening, now.
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 79424
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Reply from A_Pict
Mar.10.2008
09:42PM EDT 
vertical line I never had any devout religious upbringing. My parents weren't church-goers even though my mother was raised a Methodist and my father was raised a Lutheran.

My grandmother took it upon herself to raise me as a Lutheran. From an early age, it didn't set well with me. I found it boring and hypocritical. It was at that time I started to do the one thing the Church abhors, I started questioning the doctrine. It was at the same time I discovered the Church fears 'free-thought' and will do anything to destroy it.

I bounced-around to various other Christian faiths. None of them set well with me. It amazed me, though how different 'churches' with congregations who all pretty much believe the same thing can dislike one another. The conflict between the Catholics and Protestants in Ireland is a prime example. Mormons preach that they are tolerant yet they discriminate amongst themselves. None of this makes sense to me.

When I was in the military, I fell in with some Satanists and later became one. Anton LaVey had some interesting ideas but, as with Christianity, it fell by the wayside. It held no interest for me. Aleister Crowley was a nutcase.

After all this, I became a self-stylized 'Atheist'. I had denounced any and all forms of religion. I believed that 'religion' was not only unnecessary, but inherently dangerous. Look at how many wars were started in the name of religion.

A wiccan priestess referred me to Buddhism. I know nothing of either wicca or Buddhism. I don't regard Buddhism to be a 'religion' as there is nothing to believe. It simply is - or so I'm told.

I keep finding myself expecting to have other people guide my way. It's a habit. I'm very slowly finding out that the only person who can guide my way is myself. However, I'm also finding that looking within myself is like wading through a quagmire - a great deal of clutter to dispose of before anything vaguely resembling clarity can shine through.

I do, however, like the way Rustic worded his post. Very well done, sir :)

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Reply from shayne
Mar.10.2008
10:01PM EDT 
Email shayne
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meditate stephanie.

i was born into a family that was no religion. we believed in what we seen.

the christian religion has done me much harm. being bipolar and having strong convictions in the christian religion deep down. now i dont.

i needed medication and accept this.

meditate though.....thats your next step.

it doesnt matter what you believe.

that which looks for it is it. the self is the ultimate reality.

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Reply from shayne
Mar.10.2008
10:04PM EDT 
Email shayne
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Quote: "I never had any devout religious upbringing. My parents weren't church-goers even though my mother was raised a Methodist and my father was raised a Lutheran.

My grandmother took it upon herself to raise me as a Lutheran. From an early age, it didn't set well with me. I found it boring and hypocritical. It was at that time I started to do the one thing the Church abhors, I started questioning the doctrine. It was at the same time I discovered the Church fears 'free-thought' and will do anything to destroy it.

I bounced-around to various other Christian faiths. None of them set well with me. It amazed me, though how different 'churches' with congregations who all pretty much believe the same thing can dislike one another. The conflict between the Catholics and Protestants in Ireland is a prime example. Mormons preach that they are tolerant yet they discriminate amongst themselves. None of this makes sense to me.

When I was in the military, I fell in with some Satanists and later became one. Anton LaVey had some interesting ideas but, as with Christianity, it fell by the wayside. It held no interest for me. Aleister Crowley was a nutcase.

After all this, I became a self-stylized 'Atheist'. I had denounced any and all forms of religion. I believed that 'religion' was not only unnecessary, but inherently dangerous. Look at how many wars were started in the name of religion.

A wiccan priestess referred me to Buddhism. I know nothing of either wicca or Buddhism. I don't regard Buddhism to be a 'religion' as there is nothing to believe. It simply is - or so I'm told.

I keep finding myself expecting to have other people guide my way. It's a habit. I'm very slowly finding out that the only person who can guide my way is myself. However, I'm also finding that looking within myself is like wading through a quagmire - a great deal of clutter to dispose of before anything vaguely resembling clarity can shine through.

I do, however, like the way Rustic worded his post. Very well done, sir :)

"
.........

satanism eh? what a joke. no such thing as spells.

thats right the only way is that which guides itself. count on yourself. guide yourself.

that which looks for the ulitmate reality IS the ultimate reality.

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Reply from boymonk
Mar.11.2008
01:40AM EDT 
vertical line Check out a Zen Buddhist center if there's one in your area, BEST ADVICE!
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Reply from 9999999
Mar.11.2008
11:57AM EDT 
Email 9999999
vertical line it ok
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Reply from Woodsman
Mar.11.2008
06:00PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line I use to witness to people about Jesus, converting them, the girls converted the easiest. I'd go door to door knocking, and inviting someone to the Lord. It actually worked. Then I invited them to the church, and frequently the convert got the same message I did, from inside... "What am I doing here?" You could only hear the gospel message a few times and think, "didn't we go over this before?" A little vain repetition? Oh yeah, I'm guilty. But forgiven! Just an excuse, known as projection in psychoanalytic terms.  What an empty excuse, rather than a deep observation of what makes me sin. Eventually in school, (I was working on an art degree) I began getting psychotherapy, it was free, and someone just had to listen to me. : ) kinda like here.

I have a very vivid memory of a few of  "us"  Christian evangelists going into a the Student Union and trying to convert a Buddhist monk. We thought we were saving him. There were like 5 of us preaching around this guy. I was having my say, when the monk stopped me, looked me in the eye and said, "I use to be like you."

That one got me, started on another path. At first I remember feeling a kind of resentment for the comparison.  But now I see the monk opened my path, without me feeling ashamed of being a sinner. 
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Reply from shayne
Mar.11.2008
09:59PM EDT 
Email shayne
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Quote: "I use to witness to people about Jesus, converting them, the girls converted the easiest. I'd go door to door knocking, and inviting someone to the Lord. It actually worked. Then I invited them to the church, and frequently the convert got the same message I did, from inside... "What am I doing here?" You could only hear the gospel message a few times and think, "didn't we go over this before?" A little vain repetition? Oh yeah, I'm guilty. But forgiven! Just an excuse, known as projection in psychoanalytic terms.  What an empty excuse, rather than a deep observation of what makes me sin. Eventually in school, (I was working on an art degree) I began getting psychotherapy, it was free, and someone just had to listen to me. : ) kinda like here.

I have a very vivid memory of a few of  "us"  Christian evangelists going into a the Student Union and trying to convert a Buddhist monk. We thought we were saving him. There were like 5 of us preaching around this guy. I was having my say, when the monk stopped me, looked me in the eye and said, "I use to be like you."

That one got me, started on another path. At first I remember feeling a kind of resentment for the comparison.  But now I see the monk opened my path, without me feeling ashamed of being a sinner. 
"

sounds good johny cat
.........

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Reply from Woodsman
Mar.12.2008
10:25AM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line I still pray, yet not in any traditional  organized sense of volumes. I pray when I feel led, the feeling comes from either a sensory tactile impulse, or intense emotional stirrings. I use to do lone prostration prayers, like walk down the railroad tracks with bare feet on rocks, at night. Or I could find lost things for people, or listen to synchronous sounds match up with thoughts. I began to adapt each and every thought, every event as prayer. So God became one good listener, because I prayed in more than words. God for me is living in all things and treated as such.

Here comes a squirrel outside on the deck, man is he bein' noisy. So I have to listen.
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Reply from Woodsman
Mar.12.2008
07:03PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line Once I started reading Joseph Campbell and Jungian psychology, I was beyond the tribe mode, of course I was born that way, in Norway, foreskin intact. 
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 79473
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Reply from ______
Mar.14.2008
08:43AM EDT 
vertical line comic zen
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Reply from -----0
Mar.16.2008
07:04AM EDT 
vertical line Stephanie, what particularly makes you feel a strong connection with Zen-Buddhism?
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Reply from Snibbler
Mar.17.2008
04:03PM EDT 
vertical line Quote: "Once I started reading Joseph Campbell and Jungian psychology, I was beyond the tribe mode, of course I was born that way, in Norway, foreskin intact.  "
.........

Campbell? All-knowing no-action?:)
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Reply from Woodsman
Mar.17.2008
04:45PM EDT 
Email Woodsman
vertical line Quote: "Quote: "Once I started reading Joseph Campbell and Jungian psychology, I was beyond the tribe mode, of course I was born that way, in Norway, foreskin intact.  "
.........

Campbell? All-knowing no-action?:)
"
.........

Sweet! I love Joseph! : )
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