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→→→→ vertical line TOPIC: COLLEGE MAJOR
vertical line Posted on Jun.15.2008 @ 11:12AM EDT by Mslapik
What would be the best thing to major in where you could help other people...
Psychology, Psychiatry, Medicine, Philosophy, Religion...
I was thinking Psychology, so as to incorporate Buddhist philosophy, but I want to get you're opinions on it.

Thanks


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Reply from 9999999
Jun.15.2008
07:10PM EDT 
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vertical line the university cant teach you to be yourself or know yourself

know yourself fully before all else
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 83423
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Reply from the alan
Jun.15.2008
11:15PM EDT 
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I think the university teaches you most what NOT to do, most of the time. If you can approach religion or philosophy subjects from a more historical perspective, you will have a good foundation for further self-development. What I find about philosophy is that you'll be learning more about Western philosophy...Kant, Rousseau, Nietzsche etc. More of them offer no escape, only blames and burdens. They ideas are more like double cheeseburgers on a hot summer day...

Medicine? Please! Every doctor friend I have regretted having gone to med school. Nurses on the other hand, is a more "helpful" profession.

Regardless of what it is, I think you will find buddha-nature in everything that you do and everything that comes to you, especially if you have a compassionate nature. You can incorporate Buddhism in every aspect of every subject. I believe deep down you already know what you are going to pursue.

Al

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Reply from 9999999
Jun.15.2008
11:28PM EDT 
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vertical line aye aye Al
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Reply from ______
Jun.16.2008
08:39AM EDT 
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Quote: "
I think the university teaches you most what NOT to do, most of the time. If you can approach religion or philosophy subjects from a more historical perspective, you will have a good foundation for further self-development. What I find about philosophy is that you'll be learning more about Western philosophy...Kant, Rousseau, Nietzsche etc. More of them offer no escape, only blames and burdens. They ideas are more like double cheeseburgers on a hot summer day...

Medicine? Please! Every doctor friend I have regretted having gone to med school. Nurses on the other hand, is a more "helpful" profession.

Regardless of what it is, I think you will find buddha-nature in everything that you do and everything that comes to you, especially if you have a compassionate nature. You can incorporate Buddhism in every aspect of every subject. I believe deep down you already know what you are going to pursue.

Al

"
.........

That's a rather limited list of western philosophers.  Neither philosophy nor philosophers offers an escape - Nietzsche certainly didn't offer any escape, (escape from what/who?), quite the contrary.  Philosophy at degree level varies considerably between universities and courses.  Today most will provide the opportunity to study a wide range of philosphers and philosophies, both east and west including Advaita, Vedanta (Upanishads), Hindu and Buddhist, Christian and Muslim philosophies and the similarities/differences between east and west, looking at Aristotle, Plato, Aquinas, Eckhart, Wittgenstein, Kierkegaard, Barthe, Sartre, existentialism, Marxist philosophy (Terry Eagleton), Suzuki - to name a few, examining philosophical and theological convergences and the way theologists' ideas have been shaped by philosophical thought which in its turn has determined political values and societal mores.  So-called New Age philosophies and Gaia (as a scientific hypothesis) are studied in light of philosophies such as Advaita.


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Reply from ______
Jun.24.2008
08:42AM EDT 
vertical line The western philosopher Wittgenstein's 'Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus' can be read in the way one would read a zen koan - a logical nonsense illustrating the futility of attempting to grasp reality by thinking about it.
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Reply from Woodsman
Jun.24.2008
09:26AM EDT 
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vertical line Nursing, can take you everywhere and anywhere,  literally. Plus, you get to work next to women, who no longer have to wear little white hats. Must be willing to be on your feel a lot, and take care of a multitude of problems, created by the female nurses... just kidding. It's a great profession, good for co-dependent types, like me. Maybe psych would be a good minor, or split degree. Western medicine is thoroughly entrenched in the "fix it" mode, but individuals can vary with insight. Most people use denial as the chief emotive way of being, so when the truth comes in the form of compromised health, reality can take the form, of a nurse, male or female. Yeah... it's a wake up call.
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Reply from boymonk
Jun.24.2008
01:11PM EDT 
vertical line Philosophy can be incorporated into any area of study or vocation I believe.
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Reply from Woodsman
Jun.24.2008
02:22PM EDT 
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vertical line My first degree was in fine arts... drawing/painting. But initially I had to balance off music/art, and chose art. Eventually guitar/voice came off without a degree. After my art degree, and being disillusioned by graphic arts as employment, I worked in special ed, and alternative schools with behavior disorder teens. Worked as a pool aide, sculptors assistant, graduate assistant, grounds keeping, librarian, and logging, before the nursing. And I had several girl friends along the way.

I went to a Catholic monastery once, and couldn't sleep there at night, had to leave early the next morning, just too severe... still would be. But I'm not much of a traditionalist, and use  to be more of a reader, but that has lessened.
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Reply from 9999999
Jun.24.2008
02:34PM EDT 
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vertical line I just finished my first year at a university studying philosophy.  I decided not to return for various reasons; but really im just not returning.  I have no interest in any area of study so I appear to be at a loss regarding what to do next.

When people ask what I plan to do next I might say "Oh, I dunno" or "I'm gonna take some online classes this fall.." but when I ask myself these questions there is just a big question mark.  The whole inquiry abruptly becomes a big fat question mark.

?


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Reply from 9999999
Jun.24.2008
02:45PM EDT 
Email 9999999
vertical line Quote: "My first degree was in fine arts... drawing/painting. But initially I had to balance off music/art, and chose art. Eventually guitar/voice came off without a degree. After my art degree, and being disillusioned by graphic arts as employment, I worked in special ed, and alternative schools with behavior disorder teens. Worked as a pool aide, sculptors assistant, graduate assistant, grounds keeping, librarian, and logging, before the nursing. And I had several girl friends along the way.

I went to a Catholic monastery once, and couldn't sleep there at night, had to leave early the next morning, just too severe... still would be. But I'm not much of a traditionalist, and use  to be more of a reader, but that has lessened.
"
.........

where are you at and what do you do now ?
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Reply from 9999999
Jun.24.2008
03:14PM EDT 
Email 9999999
vertical line as for degrees..

basically you pick a degree, pay the university to fill you with garbage, and, later in life, get paid to fill other people with that garbage
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Reply from Woodsman
Jun.24.2008
05:10PM EDT 
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vertical line Working as a nurse for 16 years, presently in an ICU, nights.
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Reply from Woodsman
Jun.24.2008
05:53PM EDT 
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vertical line College is a blast. If you pick the right degree. If I had to do it again, I'd do the exact same thing.
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Reply from 9999999
Jun.24.2008
06:04PM EDT 
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vertical line ^_^
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Reply from Woodsman
Jun.24.2008
08:22PM EDT 
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vertical line College, is the topic. 
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Reply from Woodsman
Jun.24.2008
10:46PM EDT 
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vertical line I joined the army national guard to help pay for school, I guess I wouldn't do that today, I'd go air guard. Today, the environment, the cost of gas, everything is getting tighter than when I was in my early 20's. But I had to find my own directions. I've always been a pretty hands on person. Nursing is definitely a hands on profession. Each day in nursing is a little different, but there's good karma in it, and I believe that being a good nurse means suspending my own needs. My aging has dramatically changed my interest in self satisfaction, and I deal with a pretty large degree of emotional angst, and in life, this life, for me the biggest lesson is to release suffering, mine as any others. I can even feel the frustration of Alan over wayward postings, and identify with his frustration. I am guilty no doubt.. I feel the genre it self, being a written format is fairly sterile, again, I'm hands on... to see if I can heal, even here.
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Reply from kelvintan
Jun.25.2008
12:24AM EDT 
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Quote: "I joined the army national guard to help pay for school, I guess I wouldn't do that today, I'd go air guard. Today, the environment, the cost of gas, everything is getting tighter than when I was in my early 20's. But I had to find my own directions. I've always been a pretty hands on person. Nursing is definitely a hands on profession. Each day in nursing is a little different, but there's good karma in it, and I believe that being a good nurse means suspending my own needs. My aging has dramatically changed my interest in self satisfaction, and I deal with a pretty large degree of emotional angst, and in life, this life, for me the biggest lesson is to release suffering, mine as any others. I can even feel the frustration of Alan over wayward postings, and identify with his frustration. I am guilty no doubt.. I feel the genre it self, being a written format is fairly sterile, again, I'm hands on... to see if I can heal, even here. "
.........

With One Own Direction Set Many Appreciates Nursing 

With Metta

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Reply from the alan
Jun.25.2008
12:30AM EDT 
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First off, thank you all for staying on the topic.

Secondly, I want to share my experience. I was quite gung-ho to tackle Bioscience & Biotechnology right out of high school so I ended up at a school that promised so much of what I was looking for and more. I wanted to be a doctor. I wanted to help people.

After the first year, I felt completely unprepared for medical school as I did not feel that I learned anything more than my last year at high school. I asked to be "accelerated", but only to deaf ears.

After the second year with Bio, I developed my interest in computers. Having done lots of "website stuff" in the dorms, I decided to switch major to Comp Sci. After 3 days, I decided that it wasn't "right". The "Logics" class was the main reason. I couldn't comprehend the logic in "Logic" so I switched to Management Information System.

After 1 school year (2 quarters) of MIS, which comprised of all business classes, I got a co-op internship at a consulting company. I had A LOT of freedom to build and create internet applications and became passionate about it. Then it hits me, I don't need a stinking major to get a job in MIS, so I switched back to Bio to finish it out.

I ended up with 217 credits when only 185 were required to graduate (185 is about the equivalent of semester-based schools' 120+ credits), but I never made it medical school even though I completed all my requirements for pre-med (I finished college with a 4.0 GPA) *toot horn*. My opinion of the medical profession changed a great deal through college: the lack of patient-doctor relationship, the impersonal 15-minute appointments, the role of HMO, the high cost of malpractice driving the cost of healthcare to an inhumane level, etc.

In anyc ase, even with a Bio degree, I got hired by a large consulting firm immediately after school and have been there since 2000 without an ounce of regret and love my job.

So where is the "helping people" part? None, nil, nowhere. I haven't helped anyone. I helped myself and my families being a good financial provider doing the job that I love. I help companies to achieve business objectives, in turn, their bottom line. I MAY have helped some people, in some very indirect ways, but I am devoid of all true "cares" with my line of work.

My points? College may or may not get you the job you set out to get. If you want to really help people, get into a profession that provide direct care. Nursing or teaching come immediately to mind. Civil services like social work, police service, may worth some thoughts. You can excercise and maintain compassion in these lines of work, "incorporating Buddhist philosophy" if you want to think of it that way. Compassion is not only in Buddhism. You can also volunteer outside of work, if your work is not impacting people.

Best of luck with whatever you choose to do. Don't forget to have fun though, that's what college is REALLY all about. :)

Al

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Reply from ______
Jun.25.2008
09:58AM EDT 
vertical line When you're looking at a university prospectus, the glossy pictures of shiny, happy and contented students, the corporate logos, the sponsors' advertising, it can feel like you're rounding the last bend in the race to the bright new dawn of adulthood - that just over the hill yonder is where the sun is shining - it can feel like the decision you're about to make is somehow going to be cast in stone - a decision which will determine your life forever. Well, it isn't and it doesn't. You can make all the plans you want - they're only plans. I studied at university - some days were good, some were bad, I loved it, I hated it - I upset my family because I didn't attend the degree-awarding ceremony and they wanted fancy dress photos so the degree was sent through the post - it's no big deal. I was lucky in that I teamed up with some very good lecturers and thesis supervisors but university provided the opportunity for me to have access to libraries.

Those who talk about 'spiritual journeys' and the search for God, Moksha or enlightenment may stumble into reading about U. G. Krishnamurti who advocated ridding oneself of all knowledge, religion, spiritual notions, doctrines and the ideas of others - to realise the 'natural state'. [Then others went in search of U.G. because they wanted what they thought he had and because they believed he could give it to them or at least tell them where and how to find it.] U.G. spent many years practising Sadhana, yoga, meditations in search of Moksha, and hours of dialogue with so-called enlightened teachers before he decided that he'd had more than enough of it, that there would be no more Sadhana, that it was all utter meaningless nonsense, before what he calls his 'calamity' happened. So there is absolutely no way to understand whether this 'calamity' happened in spite of, or because of all those years of Sadhana. The question is irrelevant. He said that no one would want what had happened to him, that there was nothing he could have done to bring about his calamity, there was nothing anyone else could have done either - it felt like he was lucky, in that his body stumbled into it - that it happened by the grace of God.
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Reply from 9999999
Jul.01.2008
10:28PM EDT 
Email 9999999
vertical line Quote: "When you're looking at a university prospectus, the glossy pictures of shiny, happy and contented students, the corporate logos, the sponsors' advertising, it can feel like you're rounding the last bend in the race to the bright new dawn of adulthood - that just over the hill yonder is where the sun is shining - it can feel like the decision you're about to make is somehow going to be cast in stone - a decision which will determine your life forever. Well, it isn't and it doesn't. You can make all the plans you want - they're only plans. I studied at university - some days were good, some were bad, I loved it, I hated it - I upset my family because I didn't attend the degree-awarding ceremony and they wanted fancy dress photos so the degree was sent through the post - it's no big deal. I was lucky in that I teamed up with some very good lecturers and thesis supervisors but university provided the opportunity for me to have access to libraries.

Those who talk about 'spiritual journeys' and the search for God, Moksha or enlightenment may stumble into reading about U. G. Krishnamurti who advocated ridding oneself of all knowledge, religion, spiritual notions, doctrines and the ideas of others - to realise the 'natural state'. [Then others went in search of U.G. because they wanted what they thought he had and because they believed he could give it to them or at least tell them where and how to find it.] U.G. spent many years practising Sadhana, yoga, meditations in search of Moksha, and hours of dialogue with so-called enlightened teachers before he decided that he'd had more than enough of it, that there would be no more Sadhana, that it was all utter meaningless nonsense, before what he calls his 'calamity' happened. So there is absolutely no way to understand whether this 'calamity' happened in spite of, or because of all those years of Sadhana. The question is irrelevant. He said that no one would want what had happened to him, that there was nothing he could have done to bring about his calamity, there was nothing anyone else could have done either - it felt like he was lucky, in that his body stumbled into it - that it happened by the grace of God.
"
.........
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