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  The exquisite Shunkai whose other name was Suzu was compelled to marry against her wishes when she was quite young. Later, after this marriage had ended, she attended the university, where she studied philosophy. To see Shunkai was to fall... continue...

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→→→→ vertical line TOPIC: FEW QUESTIONS ABOUT BUDDHISM :)
vertical line Posted on Aug.16.2014 @ 12:59AM EDT by ChrisAus
Hi there, I am student currently in my senior year writing a report on the 'pursuit of peace' in Buddhism and was hoping I could get some answers to some questions from some practising Buddhists.

I find Buddhism an incredibly interesting religion and enjoy learning as much as I can about it, so I would greatly appreciate any input, even If you could just answer any questions you fell you can reply to. Thanks heaps in advance :D

1. In modern day society, what is 'peace' to a Buddhist?

2. Do you think this definition can realistically be achieved?

3. What makes peace such an integral part of Buddhism?

4. To my understanding, Buddhism's main concern is human progress towards nirvana. In your opinion, is this an accurate assessment?

5. Research has shown that there are many instances where Buddhists have turned to violence in order to reach an end. Does such a course of action remove Buddhists from the ultimate goal of nirvana and peace?

6. Many Buddhists who use violence as a tool explain that their actions are justified, but never really explain how… In your mind, how could acts of violence be truly justified by a Buddhist.

7. Clearly Buddhists have varying approaches in their faith, but is the final goal the same for both ends of the spectrum? Or have some Buddhists lost sight of the religion's original intentions?
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Reply from ---T e
Aug.16.2014
08:42AM EDT 
Email ---T e
vertical line Peace is every step we take What else you are looking for.
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Reply from Avisitor
Aug.16.2014
03:21PM EDT 
Email Avisitor
vertical line Hi there, I am student currently in my senior year writing a report on the 'pursuit of peace' in Buddhism and was hoping I could get some answers to some questions from some practising Buddhists.

I find Buddhism an incredibly interesting religion and enjoy learning as much as I can about it, so I would greatly appreciate any input, even If you could just answer any questions you fell you can reply to. Thanks heaps in advance :D

1. In modern day society, what is 'peace' to a Buddhist?

2. Do you think this definition can realistically be achieved?

3. What makes peace such an integral part of Buddhism?

4. To my understanding, Buddhism's main concern is human progress towards nirvana. In your opinion, is this an accurate assessment?

5. Research has shown that there are many instances where Buddhists have turned to violence in order to reach an end. Does such a course of action remove Buddhists from the ultimate goal of nirvana and peace?

6. Many Buddhists who use violence as a tool explain that their actions are justified, but never really explain how… In your mind, how could acts of violence be truly justified by a Buddhist.

7. Clearly Buddhists have varying approaches in their faith, but is the final goal the same for both ends of the spectrum? Or have some Buddhists lost sight of the religion's original intentions?


.............

1. "peace" means following the five precepts.

2. Practice Zazen and you will naturally align yourself with Buddhism and the five precepts.

3. Peace, as Buddhist understand it, is more of an internal peace and not necessarily mean peace and good will towards others.
Peace is meant as calming the mind and developing concentration.

4. Buddhism is about three things. The teachings of Buddha, the Practice of Zazen and Enlightenment.

5. That is a person whose practice of Buddhism has departed from the way of Buddhism.

6. There is no justification.

7. Buddhism is means different things to different people.
Some believe it is a philosophy.
Others believe it is a religion.
And still others pick and choose what they want to use in their lives.
It is none of these things and yet it is all of these things.
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Reply from Mugaku
Sep.03.2014
04:52AM EDT 
Email Mugaku
vertical line #1

I hope I am able to provide suitable answers for these questions. Best of wishes in these and your future endeavors :)

1. Peace in my understanding is comprised of balance (or the middle way). Peace or equanimity are facets of Nirvana. It stems from the cessation of internal conflict upon the understanding that all phenomena are part of a duality. (Hot vs Cold, Happiness vs Anger, Self vs Other, etc.) This duality does exist, however all of these things exist interdependently. As there is no definite hot or cold, these can be said to exist on a spectrum, or a continuum where one part is nearly indistinguishable from the next but from one end to the other the differences are great.

Self vs Other can be explained through buddhism as such: There is no inherent distinction between self or other. Inherent is described as being an integral part of something, this however would require it to have permanent characteristics if it were to designate some sort of permanent self or soul. As we can see through careful analyses of any number of things, nothing is permanent. This is not to deny that there is some sense of self, but only that it exists in relation to another. This is known as dependent origination in buddhism.

Having understood that there is no true permanent self, and that all phenomena, physical or mental are impermanent. On can let go of the attachments one has to all of these things. This does not mean to die or to cease being.

True nature or buddha nature (As far as buddhism is concerned) is like a mirror. It is neither light nor dark. As it does not hold any image in and of itself it has the potential to hold literally any image! This is a fantastic thing!

Once one understands that anger and sadness are allowed to exist through their attachments to people and things, they simply cease to be in the mind as they are superfluous.

This is the mind as it should be, unfettered by hatred, with the potential to hold anything within its frame.

This is peace according to buddhism.

#2

I know this definition of peace can be acheived as "I" currently experience it.

Know that the mind is naturally like this however it becomes fettered through ignorance.

#3

This experience is the "raison d'etre" of buddhism. It is the reason buddhism exists, rather you could say it is buddhism.

#4

This is an accurate assessment of the reasons to teach buddhism, or to practice Mahayana (maha=great, yana=vehicle). Buddhism teaches the path to self liberation, this can only be acheived by each individual person. Nobody can give you buddhism, you must compare everything said against your own experiences in order to verify their truthfulness.

However, there are many different schools with the goal of teaching others or rather, showing them how to teach themselves. These schools include Zen(or Chan) Buddhism, and Vajrayana Buddhism amongst others.

#5

Violence is contrary to nirvana, it causes pain to others and may hinder others in their progress towards nirvana by feeding them seeds with which to grow hatred.

Acts of violence, like all others are karma. As far as buddhism is concerned, all phenomena are interconnected. Any distinctions between things or attempts to separate them or claiming that one system is independent of another is equated to drawing lines in the sand at the beach. It may exist for a time but at some point the tide will come and wash it away. These distinctions are not real and as such all things are connected. To say that they aren't would completely contradict what be foolish.

Violence towards others sows the seeds of further anger. This does not prevent the attainment of nirvana indefinitely, it does however greatly slow the process. Violence is contrary to buddhism and as such, the seeds will prevent nirvana until they themselves cease.

All life may attain nirvana. Regardless of past actions.

#6 Acts are never wholly good nor are they wholly evil. When a zen monk strikes his disciple in a koan(a zen story) the intention matters. In this case he is simply trying to cause a shock to the disciple that he may break free of is frame of mind. Using violence as a tool for material gains is unjustifiable as it will only lead to further violence.

#7

Each person understands at their own capacity. Some people venerate a Buddharupa (rupa=form) while in a Koan a monk burns a wooden figure of the Buddha to keep himself and his disciple warm. (When the disciple disapproves he shows him that the rupa is impermanent, it is not truly the Buddha or nirvana, it's the finger pointing to the moon rather than the moon itself.)

Of greatest importance in Buddhism is effort. Effort spent towards the precepts, meditation and kindness.

It could be argued that to fail in this would mean failing to practice Buddhism. Buddhism would deem this abiding in ignorance.

Can it be said that burning the Buddharupa is better than venerating it? Does it matter?
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Reply from so_teh
Sep.03.2014
02:05PM EDT 
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The adage "all you need is love" changes from "all you need is meditation"

Love is based on a coupling, whereas meditation is based in understanding. The only way you're going to understand, and I realize your trying on an academic level, which doesn't help you but to pass the examination. So, the sincerity of academics is superficial. You need to try the practice, see for yourself the benefits of "peace" and answer the questions from that point of view. Otherwise my answers, your drive to intellectually understand, is far from the true understanding. You have to bite into the apple yourself, otherwise I'm doing your homework for you. Such is the education system. Valid questions, but ending in meaninglessness if it isn't supported by your own realization.  

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Reply from Phil Space
Sep.04.2014
09:18AM EDT 
vertical line What's that flyin' up there?
Is it a loveism? No.
Is it a meditationism? No.
Is it a comingacrossallwrongism? No.
Is it inter net ism?
Yeah.
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Reply from ---T e
Sep.04.2014
02:28PM EDT 
Email ---T e
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You are a jerk

Am I?

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 157766
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Reply from Phil Space
Sep.04.2014
03:14PM EDT 
vertical line Oh ok, yes, I'm a heretic out to fast track my spiritual life, so join the dots ... and ... tight lines.

vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 157767
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Reply from ---T e
Sep.04.2014
04:52PM EDT 
Email ---T e
vertical line I will drink some milk
vertical line Quote & Reply   Post Reply 157769
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