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  The Buddha was talking with Uttara, a young pupil of the bhramin Parasariya:
-Uttara, does Parasariya teach you how to develop your faculties?
-Yes, Master Gotama, he does teach us how to develop our faculties
-How does he do... continue...

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HOW IS SUFFERING CREATED AND HOW IS IT CEASED?
One day the Buddha was asked by the naked ascetic Kassapa:
-Master Gotama, is suffering created by oneself?
The Buddha replied:
-Not so, Kassapa.
-Then, is suffering created by another?
-Not so, Kassapa.
-Then, is suffering created by both oneself and another?
-Not so, Kassapa.
-Then, has suffering arisen by chance?
-Not so, Kassapa.
-Then, is there no suffering?
-It is not that there is no suffering, Kassapa; there is suffering.
-Then is that Master Gotama does not know and see suffering?
-It is not that I do not know and see suffering.
-So please, Master Gotama, teach me about suffering.
-Kassapa, [if you think,] "The one who acts is the same as the one
who experiences," with reference to one who existing from the beginning:
"Suffering is created by oneself." When you assert thus, this is called
the view of eternalism.

And Kassapa, [if you think], "The one who acts is one and the one who
experiences is another," then with reference to one stricken by feeling:
"Suffering is created by another." When you assert thus, this is called
the view of annihilationism.

Without taking either of those extremes, the Tathagata teaches the
Dhamma by the middle:
"With ignorance as condition, volitional formations [come to be];
with volitional formations as condition, consciouness [comes to be]....
Such is the origin of this whole mass of suffering.

With the cessation of ignorance, cessation of volitional formations;
with the cessation of volitional formations, cessation of consciousness....
Such is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering."

From "Samyutta Nikaya" of the Buddha
Adapted from Vietnamese version


 



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